Child Care

Q1:  If I
am a student, can I get help paying for child care?

If you receive Transitional Aid for Families with
Dependent Children (TAFDC),

  • You can get subsidized child care to go to
    college as long as the program is expected to lead to a job.
  • You do not have to pay a fee for child care.
  • You can get child care for up to two weeks while
    waiting to start school or training.
  • You must get a referral from the Department of
    Transitional Assistance (DTA) to apply for child care at the local Child Care
    Resource and Referral Agency. Find your local Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R) agency.
  • You must comply with TAFDC rules, including work
    requirements if applicable.

If you used to receive TAFDC but no longer do,

  • You can get subsidized child care for 12 months
    after your case closes if you are working.  You can use the child care to cover
    time in college as well as work.
  • You can get subsidized child care for up to 6
    months after your case closes to attend college if you have reached your
    24-month time limit, if DTA approved your college program, and if you need more
    time to finish.
  • You can get subsidized child care for 12 months
    after your TAFDC case closes if you are receiving unemployment insurance benefits
    and participating in a Section 30 program that meets Division of Unemployment
    Assistance requirements. See Unemployment Insurance Section 30 Program.
  • You can keep your subsidies for more than a year,
    as long as you are still in school or have another service need recognized by
    the Department of Early Education and Care, and meet income eligibility limits.
  • You must pay a fee based on income.

If you never received TAFDC,

  • You must meet income eligibility limits and pay a
    fee based on income.
  • You may have to be placed on a waiting list.
  • You can register for the child care waiting list by
    calling the nearest Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) regional office.
    Find Early Education & Care Programs on the EEC website or call 617.988.6600.
Produced by Deborah Harris, Massachusetts Law Reform Institute, and Ruthie Liberman, Crittenton Women’s Union
Created October 2010

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