Glossary

Produced by Deborah Harris, Massachusetts Law Reform Institute, and Ruthie Liberman, Crittenton Women’s Union
Created October 2010

Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI)—A CORI is
a person’s criminal history. You will have a Massachusetts CORI if you have
ever been charged with a crime in a state or federal court in Massachusetts,
whether or not your case ended with a conviction, a finding of not guilty, dismissed
charges, or another outcome. For information about how to obtain your CORI,
call the Criminal History Systems Board (CHSB) at 617.660.4600, or see the
CHSB Web site

Developmental classes—Classes to develop skills that
colleges may require before you can take classes to earn a degree or
certificate. This could include English language classes, math classes, or
other academic classes.  They may also be called “remedial classes.”

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)—Application
for financial aid from the federal government.  Many schools also use the FAFSA
to determine grants and loans.  Completing the application takes time, but
filling it out can really pay off.

Post-secondary education—Education beyond the high
school level.  If you have finished high school or earned your GED and want
further education, then you are considering post-secondary education.

Public benefits—Governmental programs and services
available to help support individuals or families who meet certain
qualifications.  Examples include Food Stamps/SNAP for help buying food or child
care assistance for help paying for child care.

Remedial classes—Classes to develop skills that
colleges may require before you can take the classes required for a certificate
or degree.  This could include English language classes, math classes, or other
academic classes.  They may also be called “developmental classes.”

Undocumented immigrant—Someone who is in the U.S. without legal status.  This person is not a citizen and does not have a green card or
visa.  People either enter the country as undocumented immigrants or become
undocumented when they are already in the U.S. and their visas expire.

Work-Study—Work-study programs provide
part-time employment to undergraduates and graduates to help with college
expenses. There are two different kinds of work-study: Federal Work-Study (FWS)
and non-Federal Work-Study. You must submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA)
(and possibly other financial aid documents required by your
school) to determine your eligibility.The work-study program encourages
employment in community service and in fields related to your major. Job
positions can be either on campus or off campus.

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